Syltgrottor/Thumbprint cookies

I love baking and my kids love baking.

I don’t however always love baking with the kids. Often it can be stressful, messy and chaotic.

But it CAN be enjoyable. What you need is some fool proof easy recipes and you’ll be ready for anything. Well, most things.

I go for recipes that are straightforward and that requires some kind of decorating part later. Kids are particularly ace at this part!

(Unless you’re a perfectionist like me and do find it mildly stressful too. You learn to breathe through it.)

I recently found this recipe in a Swedish magazine and it’s a winner. It’s definitely fool proof and your cookies will always turn out well! Your kids will love making these too, adding the jam and whatnot.

So as part of my Swedish, easy to make, kid friendly recipes, I’m going to kick things off with Syltgrottor (I hear they’re similar to Thumbprint cookies? Can anyone confirm?) .

Syltgrottor are a mixture between a shortbread and a Viennese type biscuit.

This recipe is a winner, and has never let me down.

***The key here is to not overwork the dough and chilling the dough before baking***

• 4 1/2 dl flour

• 1 dl caster sugar

• 1 tsp bakingpowder

• 2 tsp vanilla extract

• 200 g butter (room temp)

For the filling:

Your favourite type of jam. Recently we used Cloudberry and Wild Strawberry jam.

Recipe:

Turn your oven to 200°C. (180c if fan assisted)

Cream your butter and sugar. Once creamed, add your vanilla extract. Mix your dry ingredients in separate bowl.

Now quickly mix the ingredients until it all just comes together. (Don’t overwork the mixture!)

Let your dough rest in the fridge for at least 10 minutes.

Roll the dough into a cylinder and then pinch off and roll each small piece, (about the size of a walnut), into small balls.

Now place the gently into fairy cake tins. Make a hole in the cookie using your thumb and add your jam. Pop into your preheated oven for 10-12 minutes.

Take the cookies out and let them cool on a cooling rack.

Enjoy. ❤️

Love, Jess

Jessica’s Tiger Cake

I’m obsessed with cake tins. I must have about a dozen already.

I’m prepared for any kind of Cake Tin emergency. You name your party and I bet I have a tin to match.

Some tins are perhaps more obvious than other.

Like my super cute gingerbread man tin and the equally adorable snowman tin. I also have Halloween covered with my Skull and Pumpkin tins.

I also have a Swedish Dala Häst tin, a Crayfish tin, a Darth Vader tin and a Spider man tin.

I also have more “traditional” shaped Socker Kaka cake tins.

Us Swedes do love a Socker kaka. And who can blame us, they’re delicious and easy to make. And goes so well with coffee.

A triple threat type of cake.

A traditional Socker Kaka was one of the first cakes I learned to make.

Speaking of tins, I recently acquired this beauty. How gorgeous?! It’s from the American company Nordic Ware.

But it’s no use having lots of tins if you’re not going to use it so today I tried making a Swedish classic sponge Cake, a Tiger Kaka.

I added some home made hazelnut butter too. We don’t buy the ready made kind… (I’m sure you’ve all seen the super cute banner advert. If not, here you go)

Anyway, adding the hazelnut butter made it even more scrumptious.

Here’s the recipe:

Jessica’s Tiger kaka

4 dl flour

2 1/2 dl caster sugar

3 eggs

1 tsp baking powder

Pinch of salt

Dash of vanilla extract

50 g margarine

1 dl milk or single cream

2 tbsp cacao

2 tbsp hazelnut butter

Heat your oven to 160°C (fan assisted)

Butter your cake tin and add the bread crumbs.

Whisk your butter and sugar until the mixture is light and fluffy. Add your eggs, one at a time.

Mix the dry ingredients, add the milk and gently fold into your butter and sugar mixture.

Put a 1/3 of your batter into a bowl. Mix in the cacao.

Add vanilla to the other batter mix.

Put the vanilla batter into your tin. Add the hazelnut butter into little chunks. And finally, pour over your cacao mixture. Using a fork, gently mix the two different batters and nut butter together. It doesn’t have to be precise.

Put your cake in the bottom part of the oven for about 45-60 minutes.

Check with a cake stick, if the batter comes off the stick then it’s done!

Let the cake cool for 5 minutes inside the tin.

Take the cake out of the tin and let it cool on a rack.

Once cooled you can dust some icing on top or just leave it as it is.

Enjoy. ❤️

Love, Jess

Cinnamon Mince Pie Buns

Holidays are hard work.

It’s also wonderful and magical, especially when you have kids, but it can be stressful and, for some, a sad and lonely time. 

If you have family abroad then Christmas time can make you extremely home sick.

I miss my parents, family and friends, the traditions – like Lucia, but also the Christmas food and all familiar smells.

Cinnamon, cloves, church candles, Star anise, Saffron buns, Julmust, Janssson’s Frestelse, Sill in all different varieties (pickled herring), Julmust, Gingerbread, oranges and clementines.

My parents have been staying with us for a week. They are over visiting the U.K. firstly to watch Jackson perform in his very first Shakespeare play, but also to spend some time with us before Christmas.

For our special Sunday mini Christmas, or “Lill Jul”,  I got to trial a recipe I’ve been dying to try. 

The ultimate Swenglish recipe I suppose – my Cinnamon Mince Pie Buns. 

The first batch came out a bit burned (the oven was too hot), and the second batch I added too much Mince mixture to, but they still tasted nice so I was hopeful.

I made my third batch this morning and they came out beautifully golden, and, I’m happy to say, scrummy to eat. 

Here’s the recipe I used: 

Jessica’s Cinnamon Mince Pie Buns

You’ll need:

A bowl for the dough

Little bowl for the filling mixture

Pot to heat the milk and margarine 

Time: About 2 hours 30 minutes 

Dough

  • 50g fresh yeast
  • 8 dl plain flour 
  • 50 g margarine 
  • 3 dl milk
  • 1/2 dl caster sugar 
  • 1 pinch of salt 

Filling 

  • 50 g margarine 
  • 2 tsp cinnamon 
  • 1/2 dl caster sugar 
  •  4 tbsp Mince Mixture 

Garnish 

  • 1 egg or milk
  •  Pearl sugar 

Make the Dough:

Crumble the yeast and put in a bowl.  Melt the margarine in a pot and add the milk. Warm the milk mixture until 37°C. Now pour some of the mixture over the dough and gently stir until the yeast has dissolved. 

Add the remainder of the milk mixture, sugar, salt and about 6 1/2 dl flour. (You’ll add the rest later when working the dough)

Start working the dough, either by hand or by using a machine. (Start with paddle and change for the hook attachment as you gradually add the flour) 

The dough is ready when it’s silky smooth and not sticking to the sides of the bowl. 

Put a cloth over the bowl and let the dough rest for about 30 min.

For the Filling: 

Cream your sugar and cinnamon with the margarine until you get a fine paste.

Once proved, start working your dough again. Add the remaining flour, little by little. Feel your way here; if you add too much flour your cinnamon buns will end up too dry. 

Cut the dough into two. Now roll each piece into a rectangular shape.

Add your cinnamon paste and your mince mixture. 

I added about two tablespoons for each dough.

From the longer side, roll each dough into a cylinder shape. Use a sharp knife to cut 2 cm thick pieces.

Put your cut pieces, either in paper bun cups or straight onto a tray with baking paper. 

Cover your Cinnamon Mince Pie Buns and let them prove for about 20 min. (They should double in size) 

Brush your buns with the whisked egg or milk and sprinkle the pearl sugar on top. 

Bake your buns in a very hot oven (250°C, 200°C for about 8 mins or until golden brown. 

Place on a rack to cool. ENJOY. 

God Jul ❤️ Merry Merry 

Love, Jess

Love Halloween Hate Scary Movies

I love Halloween. 

Jackson trialling his electrifying Halloween costume

I love dressing up for Halloween. Under duress I dress up my children, dog and house. My husband is down with the dressing up but he’s firstly awesome and secondly an actor, so dressing up is second nature. 

My decoration collection has steadily been growing for years. A lot of the supermarkets stock a lot of fabulous Halloween decorations nowadays and I always head to TKMaxx for any fun/extravagant extras. And I ain’t done yet. 

Alfie wearing his Lion outfit

Every year I research different themes and  with the kids we come up with fun ghoulish food and drinks menus. I go full out. 

(Mind you, that is true for most Holidays. I go BIG. But that’s for another day) 

However, as we have small children I try and find themes that are less offensive and scary. 

More Casper, less Pennywise if you will. 

I love Halloween. The autumnal colours, pumpkin soup, dia de los muertos, candy, being creative – not only when it comes to costumes, but also the food. 

I hate Scary Movies. 

I really, really do. 

Watching Poltergeist as a teenager positively traumatised me. I had nightmares for weeks. Heck, even now, if I see the TV flicker the hairs at the back of my neck stand up. 

And don’t even get me started on those twins in the Shining or Linda Blair in The Exorcist.

Even though I dislike them so much, I’ve somehow watched most of the more notorious scary films. 

As an adult though I refuse to watch them. My imagination runs away with me and I can’t sleep.  

A lot of pop-culture references and iconic characters come from horror films. I’m sure you can name a few; Michael Myers, Jason, Norman Bates or (perhaps the scariest of all) Freddy Krueger. 

 Fortuitously, growing up I missed the whole Nightmare on Elm Street franchise and recently I thought it a splendid idea to acquaint myself with it.  You know, to see what all the fuss was about. 

Surely it wouldn’t be scary now, I’m a grown woman, it’s the middle of the day, it’s just a film. 

Wrong. 

Brooks found me on our sofa in the lounge, pop music blasting out from the speakers, all the lights on, no sound on the TV watching Nightmare of Elm Street, hiding behind a big pillow. 

This year we’ll be away in Spain for Halloween so the kids and I decided to have our own spooktastic party early.

We’re making spooky brownies, spooky cupcakes and mummy frankfurters. 

Today we were making hot dog mummies. Such an easy dish to make and the kids love it. Here is the recipe I used: 

Frankfurter Mummy

You’ll need:

  • a packet of hot dogs/Frankfurters (8)
  • puff pastry, either shop bought or make your own 
  • Mustard 
  • Edible Eyes, for decorating once cooked and cooled
  • An egg (for the egg wash) 
  • Ketchup for the (historically inaccurate, yet very tasty) blood
Puff pastry ready to be cut into strips

Preheat your oven to about 180 (160 Fan assisted)

Take your puff pastry out and carefully cut out thin strips.

Now thread the strips around the frankfurters. You don’t have to be too precise, they’re mummies after all.

Once you’ve covered them with pastry, place them on a baking sheet. 

Egg wash your frankfurter mummies.

Place in your oven and bake until the pastry is brown. (About 15 – 20 minutes or so) 

Take your hot dogs out and let them cool. Add little dots of mustard at the top of every frankfurter and add the edible eyes for the finished look. 

Enjoy! 

Frankfurter Mummies

How to make Swiss Meringue Raspberry Buttercream Icing

Söndagsbak.

It all starts off so harmoniously and zen.

You and your Child relaxed and ready to do some baking together.

Bonding time.

The Child gets to stir and mix the batter and help pour the batter into the cake tin. Most of the precious cake batter ends up on the floor and although you flinch involuntarily, you’re still pretty zen and it’s okay because, you know, it’s baking with Child time. But then halfway through, whilst stirring your Swiss meringue icing thinking why on Earth you decided to attempt a **Swiss Meringue, you realise that – No! You’re not actually that relaxed about the whole baking with Child thing and “No! you can’t pour oregano into the egg whites!!”

Still.

It was lovely to eat the cake in the end. And the icing was to die for.

Here’s the icing recipe I used:

Swiss Meringue Raspberry Buttercream

I started with my raspberry coulis. I heated the raspberries on a gentle heat in a pot until they were breaking down.

Once cooled, I ran it through the food processors and finally through a sieve to remove the pips.

Onto your icing. Your eggs should be at room temperature. Leave those bad boys out early on so they’re ready for baking time.

Whip your egg whites and sugar in a bowl over a simmering pan of water. The bowl shouldn’t touch the water. Keep whisking continuously. You need to keep going until it turns silky and smooth. The mixture will turn thinner and frothier as you go on.

A good tip is that if you rub the mixture between your fingers and if it’s grainy then KEEP GOING. (It took about 10 minutes of continuous stirring to get to this point). It’s really weird because I kept thinking it’s neeeeeeveer going to turn and then suddenly you end up with a silky and smooth texture.

The next step is important. Make sure your mixture is cool completely before you start adding your butter!

It’ll end up a runny mess otherwise – take my word for it! Ahem…

Once the mixture is cool, start whisking until stiff peaks. (Coincidentally this is a good time to reintroduce Child to the baking process. Try the old “I will flip the Meringue mixture over my head to see if it’s set.”)

Anyway. The result is amazing. The icing is so silky and luxurious!

Now you add your butter. It should be room temperature but still be able to hold its shape.

Add about a tablespoon at a time, and keep mixing.

Once I had added all my butter I mixed in the raspberry coulis, a pinch of sea salt (balance is everything right?) and stirred.

The result was absolutely fantastic! I’ll definitely be using this frosting/icing from now on. So tasty and not too sweet. Just spot on.

*Do not worry if your mixture is too runny. It’s still salvageable. I put it back into the fridge to cool down for twenty minutes and it was good to go.

**It really wasn’t that much extra work. It sounds like a palaver but it’s not. Trust me.