Lemon and Tomato Stuffed Sea Bream

My dad is a Fisherman, so fish was always been part of our weekly diet.

Growing up, I didn’t really appreciate the freshly caught fish on our dinner table. I didn’t realise how fortunate I was. But I do now. I crave it.

I don’t like to mess around with the fish though. It’s truly beautiful gently oven roasted with a few accompanying ingredients.

My husband had to have a major operation this week and nothing says “I love you” as a home cooked meal.

* So the night before my husband’s big operation I made him some beautiful oven cooked Lemon and Tomato Stuffed Sea Bream.

Here’s the recipe:

2 whole sea-breams (cleaned and gutted)

5 large potatoes (for the mash)

50 ml whole milk (for the mash)

2 garlic cloves

6 small tomatoes on the vine

1 tbsp olive oil

2 lemons

Couple of sprigs of thyme

Good quality butter (for mash and the fish)

1. Heat the oven to 200C/180C fan/gas 6. 2. Peel the potatoes, cut into chunks and, put in a large saucepan and cover with cold water. Bring to the boil and add salt, cook for 20 minutes or so. (Depends on the type of potato you’re using).

Once cooked, drain and start mashing. Add a little bit butter and milk for taste and texture.

3. Rinse the fish properly. Now slash the fish through the flesh down to the bone.

4. Season and rub with the olive oil.

5. Slice the lemon into medium slices. (In term of the thickness, think a pound coin.).

6. Add the lemon slices to the cavities of the fish.

7. Now add your washed tomatoes to the belly cavity and a sprig of thyme.

8. Chuck in some pieces of butter on top of your fish fillets.

9. Bake in your preheated oven for about 20-25 minutes.

10. Baste the fish occasionally during the cook.

11. Serve with your mashed potato and vegetables.

Enjoy ❤️

Love, Jess

* Yes. I know. If you know us well you’ll know fish isn’t Brooks’ favourite protein. But fish will keep you strong and felt appropriate somehow. ❤️

Easy Peasy S’mores

“First I drink the coffee, then I do the things.”

Sums me up pretty accurately.

It can’t be any kind of coffee though. I’m quite particular. It has to be strong, with a healthy helping of frothy milk in a nice mug or cup. Yes, slightly OCD perhaps but there we are. I am a mum of three, I don’t have lots of luxuries left in this world.

But I also really like to experiment with coffee beans. I like to mix in some hazelnut coffee with my normal coffee beans. In time for Halloween and thanksgiving it’s Pumpkin spice.

Not the syrup mind you – it has to be the actual bean. I find the syrup too sickly for my liking.

My absolute favourite is an Amaretto Flavoured coffee from the Little Coffee Box Co. Just like dunking a gorgeous biscotti in your coffee!

Recently I discovered S’mores Coffee and it’s amazing. It tastes just like you’d expect it to. I can imagine sitting by the campfire with a cup of coffee slowing devouring some scrummy S’mores at the same time.

Speaking of S’mores. I found a really easy peasy recipe online I’d like to share with you.

Most S’mores recipes call out for Graham crackers. Unfortunately we don’t have them in England and so I was thrilled when I discovered this recipe which uses McVities Milk Chocolate Biscuits.

This recipe is so simple. Honestly, It’ll only take a few minutes to prep, cook and eat.

You’ll need:

⁃ Milk Chocolate Digestives

⁃ Marshmallows

⁃ Skewers or thin sticks

• Place the biscuit on a plate, chocolate-side up. This will be the base of your S’more.

• Set the top biscuit close by.

• Prep your bamboo sticks by soaking them in water

• Thread your marshmallows on the bamboo skewer

• Toast your marshmallows over an open flame until they’re hot and soft in the middle. If they catch on fire, just blow them out and continue toasting until browned. They’ll be even nicer!!

• Slide the toasted marshmallows onto the biscuit (chocolate side) and sandwich the top cookie on top.

• Press down slightly until the marshmallow oozes out the sides a little… Heaven.

Enjoy ❤️

Love, Jess

The National Trust and the unfortunate tale of Lady Arabella Stuart

When I was little I used to subscribe to a Swedish comic series called Kamratposten. It tackled all the issues a nine year year old might face; friendships, jealousy, love, hate, and most importantly not getting Applejack for a Christmas present.

I’m still upset about that one.

In my teens I moved on to Veckorevyn. The Swedish equivalent of Teen Vouge if you like. It had lots of teen advice, interviews with Hollywood and pop stars, make up tips and shiny posters. Who doesn’t need to know what Jason Priestley and Luke Perry’s favourite breakfast cereal is?

(Seriously though. What are their favourite breakfast cereal?! I might have to find out!)

And don’t worry Petra – Luke Perry is still yours!

As an adult I’ve tried a few subscriptions – a certain popular health mag, (in the hope that I would somehow become more healthy just by reading it), a monthly cookbook club, the National Geographics, Science magazines, Mother&Baby, Snack subscriptions and more.

There is one subscription though that I would wholeheartedly recommend, and it’s a gem.

The National Trust

(https://www.nationaltrust.org.uk) describes themselves like this:

“We look after special places throughout England, Wales and Northern Ireland for ever, for everyone.

…We restore them, protect them and open them up to everyone. For the Trust, conservation has always gone hand-in-hand with public access.”

We are so fortunate in this country to have so much history, so many stunning places to visit, and just being able to walk around these grand old estates and houses, learning about its past owners.

We’ve been to quite a few National Trust places and they all have their own individual charm.

There’s generally beautiful gardens and/or woods to explore, gorgeous food – often locally sourced and a gift shop. (I love a gift shop.)

It’s the perfect day out for the whole family.

When we go there’s mum and dad, grandparents, a 90-year old great granny, kids, a baby and dog. A tall order!

When we stayed in the Peak District last we visited Hardwick Hall.

Built in the late 1590’s the house and the furnishings were very impressive, but what really stuck with me was the story.

Its first owner Bess of Hardwick was an extraordinary woman. She came from humble beginnings to becoming the second wealthiest woman in the country, after Queen Elizabeth. She married four times, and seemed a remarkable woman for her times.

This is also a stark contrast to poor Lady Arbella Stuart, Bess of Hardwick’s grand daughter. Related to the Queen Elizabeth and Mary, Queen of Scots, she was thrown into the middle of royal intrigues and was practically imprisoned at Hardwick Hall for most of her life.

Bess brought her up to be fit for the royal court. She was introduced to Queen Elizabeth who was very impressed by the girl. But when Arbella’s aunt, Mary Queen of Scots was executed she fell into Queen Elizabeth’s bad books and Bess had to keep Arabella away from all society.

As an only way out of her house arrest, Arabella fought for her right to marry a man of her own choosing.

She almost did manage to escape to France with her beloved, William Seymour, but was caught and put in the Tower where she died aged only 39.

How there’s not been a series about this house, and these remarkable women, is a mystery to me!

And we’ll need a King James and a William Seymour. I wonder if Jason Priestley and Luke Perry can do English accents?

Love, Jess

Swedish Meatball Puff Pastry Rolls

A match made in heaven?

I noticed him straight away. He was very tall and handsome and had luscious floppy hair. He was charming and confident with a cheeky smile to match.

He asked me where I was from and I said Sweden. He said he liked meatballs from IKEA. I asked where he was from. I said I really like a Sunday Roast.

We would end up being in the same class at Uni for three years but our love didn’t blossom until our third year when we were cast opposite each other in a Midsummer Night’s Dream.

Being a Swenglish family means we get to pick and choose the best bits from both cultures. I make foods that I love from home, as well as dishes from my new home country.

Some purist would say one shouldn’t mess with perfection but I think fusions enrich our lives.

So the humble Swedish meatball. And an English sausage roll.

I decided to marry the two and the result was beautiful.

Here is the recipe:

Jessica’s Swedish Meatball Sausage Rolls

Best served with a lingonberry jam creme fraiche dipping sauce on the side.

250g Beef Mince

250g Pork Mince

1 dl milk

1 dl single cream

1 dl crumbs

2 eggs (1 for the mixture, 1 for the egg wash)

2 tsp salt

1 tsp ground white pepper

1 tsp cinnamon

1/2 tsp sugar

Margarine (for frying the meatballs)

For the Dipping Sauce

⁃ Lingonberry Jam (Ocado and ScandiKitchen sells this in the U.K.)

⁃ Creme fraiche

Add your cream and milk to the breadcrumbs and let it stand for 10 minutes. Stir gently.

Put your Mince in a bowl and mix in your spices carefully, followed by your egg and lastly the breadcrumb/cream mixture.

Get your pan ready. Now wash your hands and get rolling! Start by rolling the meatballs and putting them one by one on a side plate, ready for some frying.

Once you’re done with the rolling, start frying! Make sure you shake the pan from time to time as you want an even cook.

Once cooked take them off the heat and let them cool completely.

Get your puff pastry and cut into thin strips.

Now roll your meatballs up into little rolls, just like you would a sausage roll.

Once you’ve wrapped the meatballs in pasty, get some egg wash on them. This will give the pastry a nice shine.

Put your meatball puff pastry roll into a hot oven (180, fan assisted) for about 10-5 minutes – or until the pastry is nice and golden.

In the meantime, mix your lingonberry jam with a bit or creme fraiche into a nice thick dipping sauce.

Take your meatball roll out of the oven and serve.

Enjoy. ❤️

Love, Jess

Jessica’s Tiger Cake

I’m obsessed with cake tins. I must have about a dozen already.

I’m prepared for any kind of Cake Tin emergency. You name your party and I bet I have a tin to match.

Some tins are perhaps more obvious than other.

Like my super cute gingerbread man tin and the equally adorable snowman tin. I also have Halloween covered with my Skull and Pumpkin tins.

I also have a Swedish Dala Häst tin, a Crayfish tin, a Darth Vader tin and a Spider man tin.

I also have more “traditional” shaped Socker Kaka cake tins.

Us Swedes do love a Socker kaka. And who can blame us, they’re delicious and easy to make. And goes so well with coffee.

A triple threat type of cake.

A traditional Socker Kaka was one of the first cakes I learned to make.

Speaking of tins, I recently acquired this beauty. How gorgeous?! It’s from the American company Nordic Ware.

But it’s no use having lots of tins if you’re not going to use it so today I tried making a Swedish classic sponge Cake, a Tiger Kaka.

I added some home made hazelnut butter too. We don’t buy the ready made kind… (I’m sure you’ve all seen the super cute banner advert. If not, here you go)

Anyway, adding the hazelnut butter made it even more scrumptious.

Here’s the recipe:

Jessica’s Tiger kaka

4 dl flour

2 1/2 dl caster sugar

3 eggs

1 tsp baking powder

Pinch of salt

Dash of vanilla extract

50 g margarine

1 dl milk or single cream

2 tbsp cacao

2 tbsp hazelnut butter

Heat your oven to 160°C (fan assisted)

Butter your cake tin and add the bread crumbs.

Whisk your butter and sugar until the mixture is light and fluffy. Add your eggs, one at a time.

Mix the dry ingredients, add the milk and gently fold into your butter and sugar mixture.

Put a 1/3 of your batter into a bowl. Mix in the cacao.

Add vanilla to the other batter mix.

Put the vanilla batter into your tin. Add the hazelnut butter into little chunks. And finally, pour over your cacao mixture. Using a fork, gently mix the two different batters and nut butter together. It doesn’t have to be precise.

Put your cake in the bottom part of the oven for about 45-60 minutes.

Check with a cake stick, if the batter comes off the stick then it’s done!

Let the cake cool for 5 minutes inside the tin.

Take the cake out of the tin and let it cool on a rack.

Once cooled you can dust some icing on top or just leave it as it is.

Enjoy. ❤️

Love, Jess

Cinnamon Mince Pie Buns

Holidays are hard work.

It’s also wonderful and magical, especially when you have kids, but it can be stressful and, for some, a sad and lonely time. 

If you have family abroad then Christmas time can make you extremely home sick.

I miss my parents, family and friends, the traditions – like Lucia, but also the Christmas food and all familiar smells.

Cinnamon, cloves, church candles, Star anise, Saffron buns, Julmust, Janssson’s Frestelse, Sill in all different varieties (pickled herring), Julmust, Gingerbread, oranges and clementines.

My parents have been staying with us for a week. They are over visiting the U.K. firstly to watch Jackson perform in his very first Shakespeare play, but also to spend some time with us before Christmas.

For our special Sunday mini Christmas, or “Lill Jul”,  I got to trial a recipe I’ve been dying to try. 

The ultimate Swenglish recipe I suppose – my Cinnamon Mince Pie Buns. 

The first batch came out a bit burned (the oven was too hot), and the second batch I added too much Mince mixture to, but they still tasted nice so I was hopeful.

I made my third batch this morning and they came out beautifully golden, and, I’m happy to say, scrummy to eat. 

Here’s the recipe I used: 

Jessica’s Cinnamon Mince Pie Buns

You’ll need:

A bowl for the dough

Little bowl for the filling mixture

Pot to heat the milk and margarine 

Time: About 2 hours 30 minutes 

Dough

  • 50g fresh yeast
  • 8 dl plain flour 
  • 50 g margarine 
  • 3 dl milk
  • 1/2 dl caster sugar 
  • 1 pinch of salt 

Filling 

  • 50 g margarine 
  • 2 tsp cinnamon 
  • 1/2 dl caster sugar 
  •  4 tbsp Mince Mixture 

Garnish 

  • 1 egg or milk
  •  Pearl sugar 

Make the Dough:

Crumble the yeast and put in a bowl.  Melt the margarine in a pot and add the milk. Warm the milk mixture until 37°C. Now pour some of the mixture over the dough and gently stir until the yeast has dissolved. 

Add the remainder of the milk mixture, sugar, salt and about 6 1/2 dl flour. (You’ll add the rest later when working the dough)

Start working the dough, either by hand or by using a machine. (Start with paddle and change for the hook attachment as you gradually add the flour) 

The dough is ready when it’s silky smooth and not sticking to the sides of the bowl. 

Put a cloth over the bowl and let the dough rest for about 30 min.

For the Filling: 

Cream your sugar and cinnamon with the margarine until you get a fine paste.

Once proved, start working your dough again. Add the remaining flour, little by little. Feel your way here; if you add too much flour your cinnamon buns will end up too dry. 

Cut the dough into two. Now roll each piece into a rectangular shape.

Add your cinnamon paste and your mince mixture. 

I added about two tablespoons for each dough.

From the longer side, roll each dough into a cylinder shape. Use a sharp knife to cut 2 cm thick pieces.

Put your cut pieces, either in paper bun cups or straight onto a tray with baking paper. 

Cover your Cinnamon Mince Pie Buns and let them prove for about 20 min. (They should double in size) 

Brush your buns with the whisked egg or milk and sprinkle the pearl sugar on top. 

Bake your buns in a very hot oven (250°C, 200°C for about 8 mins or until golden brown. 

Place on a rack to cool. ENJOY. 

God Jul ❤️ Merry Merry 

Love, Jess

Be Kind. Always.

The flight home from our holiday was…. interesting. A wee bit challenging. 

Okay.  I’m just going to say it – it was pretty awful. 

Alfie had picked up a cold on our last day (but, of course) and so he was feeling a bit under the weather. And he’d started teething again.   Hello Molars! 

And then we had the delightful flight delay at Tenerife airport (thanks TUI) for no apparent reason, which every parent dreads anyway. 

I could feel that Alfie was getting anxious before we’d even got to sit down in our seats.  It then transpires that Alfie was only allowed to sit on the left hand side of the plane. (Whaaa?) 

I was seated on the right, with the other kids. Brooks was sat across the aisle on the left.

We find that it’s better for all the kids to be sat together and the other adult across the row and we sort of tag team.  

Jackson always helps with Alfie, and Maggie to be fair, and it seems to work well. And he settles better with mummy at the moment.  

But I digress. 

Luckily, the kind lady and her son next to Brooks agreed to swap seats.  

But Alfie was already wriggling and as the plane took off, so did he. He screamed for a good 10 minutes. And I mean – he screamed like only a teething/ear-aching baby can. 

Then he fell asleep for an hour and seemed a bit perkier but then the screaming started again as we started our descent into Gatwick.  

I tried everything. Feeding him, cuddling him, distracting him. Nothing worked. Thinking about his cold, it must have been his ears. 

Normally, you would get a few passive aggressive sighs and angry stares from other passengers – but not this time. 

There was so much kindness. So much understanding. Honestly, I was surprised and really touched by how wonderful our fellow passengers were. It must have been a tricky flight for them too, but rather than huffing and puffing, they showed their solidarity. 

One older lady passed me a fan to try and cool him off, another woman in the row behind us put her hand on my shoulder, smiled and said: “We’ve all been there honey. Don’t worry”. 

As soon as we touched down in London Alfie stopped crying and we made it home, tired but happy.

Travelling with kids is challenging, no matter how many kids you have. Parenting  is hard. 

Feeling the support from our fellow passengers on the plane made the trip bearable and definitely reignited my faith in humanity again. 

As the saying goes:

“Be kind; you never know what someone else is going through.”