Swedish Meatball Puff Pastry Rolls

A match made in heaven?

I noticed him straight away. He was very tall and handsome and had luscious floppy hair. He was charming and confident with a cheeky smile to match.

He asked me where I was from and I said Sweden. He said he liked meatballs from IKEA. I asked where he was from. I said I really like a Sunday Roast.

We would end up being in the same class at Uni for three years but our love didn’t blossom until our third year when we were cast opposite each other in a Midsummer Night’s Dream.

Being a Swenglish family means we get to pick and choose the best bits from both cultures. I make foods that I love from home, as well as dishes from my new home country.

Some purist would say one shouldn’t mess with perfection but I think fusions enrich our lives.

So the humble Swedish meatball. And an English sausage roll.

I decided to marry the two and the result was beautiful.

Here is the recipe:

Jessica’s Swedish Meatball Sausage Rolls

Best served with a lingonberry jam creme fraiche dipping sauce on the side.

250g Beef Mince

250g Pork Mince

1 dl milk

1 dl single cream

1 dl crumbs

2 eggs (1 for the mixture, 1 for the egg wash)

2 tsp salt

1 tsp ground white pepper

1 tsp cinnamon

1/2 tsp sugar

Margarine (for frying the meatballs)

For the Dipping Sauce

⁃ Lingonberry Jam (Ocado and ScandiKitchen sells this in the U.K.)

⁃ Creme fraiche

Add your cream and milk to the breadcrumbs and let it stand for 10 minutes. Stir gently.

Put your Mince in a bowl and mix in your spices carefully, followed by your egg and lastly the breadcrumb/cream mixture.

Get your pan ready. Now wash your hands and get rolling! Start by rolling the meatballs and putting them one by one on a side plate, ready for some frying.

Once you’re done with the rolling, start frying! Make sure you shake the pan from time to time as you want an even cook.

Once cooked take them off the heat and let them cool completely.

Get your puff pastry and cut into thin strips.

Now roll your meatballs up into little rolls, just like you would a sausage roll.

Once you’ve wrapped the meatballs in pasty, get some egg wash on them. This will give the pastry a nice shine.

Put your meatball puff pastry roll into a hot oven (180, fan assisted) for about 10-5 minutes – or until the pastry is nice and golden.

In the meantime, mix your lingonberry jam with a bit or creme fraiche into a nice thick dipping sauce.

Take your meatball roll out of the oven and serve.

Enjoy. ❤️

Love, Jess

Jessica’s Tiger Cake

I’m obsessed with cake tins. I must have about a dozen already.

I’m prepared for any kind of Cake Tin emergency. You name your party and I bet I have a tin to match.

Some tins are perhaps more obvious than other.

Like my super cute gingerbread man tin and the equally adorable snowman tin. I also have Halloween covered with my Skull and Pumpkin tins.

I also have a Swedish Dala Häst tin, a Crayfish tin, a Darth Vader tin and a Spider man tin.

I also have more “traditional” shaped Socker Kaka cake tins.

Us Swedes do love a Socker kaka. And who can blame us, they’re delicious and easy to make. And goes so well with coffee.

A triple threat type of cake.

A traditional Socker Kaka was one of the first cakes I learned to make.

Speaking of tins, I recently acquired this beauty. How gorgeous?! It’s from the American company Nordic Ware.

But it’s no use having lots of tins if you’re not going to use it so today I tried making a Swedish classic sponge Cake, a Tiger Kaka.

I added some home made hazelnut butter too. We don’t buy the ready made kind… (I’m sure you’ve all seen the super cute banner advert. If not, here you go)

Anyway, adding the hazelnut butter made it even more scrumptious.

Here’s the recipe:

Jessica’s Tiger kaka

4 dl flour

2 1/2 dl caster sugar

3 eggs

1 tsp baking powder

Pinch of salt

Dash of vanilla extract

50 g margarine

1 dl milk or single cream

2 tbsp cacao

2 tbsp hazelnut butter

Heat your oven to 160°C (fan assisted)

Butter your cake tin and add the bread crumbs.

Whisk your butter and sugar until the mixture is light and fluffy. Add your eggs, one at a time.

Mix the dry ingredients, add the milk and gently fold into your butter and sugar mixture.

Put a 1/3 of your batter into a bowl. Mix in the cacao.

Add vanilla to the other batter mix.

Put the vanilla batter into your tin. Add the hazelnut butter into little chunks. And finally, pour over your cacao mixture. Using a fork, gently mix the two different batters and nut butter together. It doesn’t have to be precise.

Put your cake in the bottom part of the oven for about 45-60 minutes.

Check with a cake stick, if the batter comes off the stick then it’s done!

Let the cake cool for 5 minutes inside the tin.

Take the cake out of the tin and let it cool on a rack.

Once cooled you can dust some icing on top or just leave it as it is.

Enjoy. ❤️

Love, Jess

Cinnamon Mince Pie Buns

Holidays are hard work.

It’s also wonderful and magical, especially when you have kids, but it can be stressful and, for some, a sad and lonely time. 

If you have family abroad then Christmas time can make you extremely home sick.

I miss my parents, family and friends, the traditions – like Lucia, but also the Christmas food and all familiar smells.

Cinnamon, cloves, church candles, Star anise, Saffron buns, Julmust, Janssson’s Frestelse, Sill in all different varieties (pickled herring), Julmust, Gingerbread, oranges and clementines.

My parents have been staying with us for a week. They are over visiting the U.K. firstly to watch Jackson perform in his very first Shakespeare play, but also to spend some time with us before Christmas.

For our special Sunday mini Christmas, or “Lill Jul”,  I got to trial a recipe I’ve been dying to try. 

The ultimate Swenglish recipe I suppose – my Cinnamon Mince Pie Buns. 

The first batch came out a bit burned (the oven was too hot), and the second batch I added too much Mince mixture to, but they still tasted nice so I was hopeful.

I made my third batch this morning and they came out beautifully golden, and, I’m happy to say, scrummy to eat. 

Here’s the recipe I used: 

Jessica’s Cinnamon Mince Pie Buns

You’ll need:

A bowl for the dough

Little bowl for the filling mixture

Pot to heat the milk and margarine 

Time: About 2 hours 30 minutes 

Dough

  • 50g fresh yeast
  • 8 dl plain flour 
  • 50 g margarine 
  • 3 dl milk
  • 1/2 dl caster sugar 
  • 1 pinch of salt 

Filling 

  • 50 g margarine 
  • 2 tsp cinnamon 
  • 1/2 dl caster sugar 
  •  4 tbsp Mince Mixture 

Garnish 

  • 1 egg or milk
  •  Pearl sugar 

Make the Dough:

Crumble the yeast and put in a bowl.  Melt the margarine in a pot and add the milk. Warm the milk mixture until 37°C. Now pour some of the mixture over the dough and gently stir until the yeast has dissolved. 

Add the remainder of the milk mixture, sugar, salt and about 6 1/2 dl flour. (You’ll add the rest later when working the dough)

Start working the dough, either by hand or by using a machine. (Start with paddle and change for the hook attachment as you gradually add the flour) 

The dough is ready when it’s silky smooth and not sticking to the sides of the bowl. 

Put a cloth over the bowl and let the dough rest for about 30 min.

For the Filling: 

Cream your sugar and cinnamon with the margarine until you get a fine paste.

Once proved, start working your dough again. Add the remaining flour, little by little. Feel your way here; if you add too much flour your cinnamon buns will end up too dry. 

Cut the dough into two. Now roll each piece into a rectangular shape.

Add your cinnamon paste and your mince mixture. 

I added about two tablespoons for each dough.

From the longer side, roll each dough into a cylinder shape. Use a sharp knife to cut 2 cm thick pieces.

Put your cut pieces, either in paper bun cups or straight onto a tray with baking paper. 

Cover your Cinnamon Mince Pie Buns and let them prove for about 20 min. (They should double in size) 

Brush your buns with the whisked egg or milk and sprinkle the pearl sugar on top. 

Bake your buns in a very hot oven (250°C, 200°C for about 8 mins or until golden brown. 

Place on a rack to cool. ENJOY. 

God Jul ❤️ Merry Merry 

Love, Jess

Be Kind. Always.

The flight home from our holiday was…. interesting. A wee bit challenging. 

Okay.  I’m just going to say it – it was pretty awful. 

Alfie had picked up a cold on our last day (but, of course) and so he was feeling a bit under the weather. And he’d started teething again.   Hello Molars! 

And then we had the delightful flight delay at Tenerife airport (thanks TUI) for no apparent reason, which every parent dreads anyway. 

I could feel that Alfie was getting anxious before we’d even got to sit down in our seats.  It then transpires that Alfie was only allowed to sit on the left hand side of the plane. (Whaaa?) 

I was seated on the right, with the other kids. Brooks was sat across the aisle on the left.

We find that it’s better for all the kids to be sat together and the other adult across the row and we sort of tag team.  

Jackson always helps with Alfie, and Maggie to be fair, and it seems to work well. And he settles better with mummy at the moment.  

But I digress. 

Luckily, the kind lady and her son next to Brooks agreed to swap seats.  

But Alfie was already wriggling and as the plane took off, so did he. He screamed for a good 10 minutes. And I mean – he screamed like only a teething/ear-aching baby can. 

Then he fell asleep for an hour and seemed a bit perkier but then the screaming started again as we started our descent into Gatwick.  

I tried everything. Feeding him, cuddling him, distracting him. Nothing worked. Thinking about his cold, it must have been his ears. 

Normally, you would get a few passive aggressive sighs and angry stares from other passengers – but not this time. 

There was so much kindness. So much understanding. Honestly, I was surprised and really touched by how wonderful our fellow passengers were. It must have been a tricky flight for them too, but rather than huffing and puffing, they showed their solidarity. 

One older lady passed me a fan to try and cool him off, another woman in the row behind us put her hand on my shoulder, smiled and said: “We’ve all been there honey. Don’t worry”. 

As soon as we touched down in London Alfie stopped crying and we made it home, tired but happy.

Travelling with kids is challenging, no matter how many kids you have. Parenting  is hard. 

Feeling the support from our fellow passengers on the plane made the trip bearable and definitely reignited my faith in humanity again. 

As the saying goes:

“Be kind; you never know what someone else is going through.” 

I caught the travelling bug when I was eight

Traveling with kids – the airplane edition

Our oldest is a seasoned traveller after years of commuting between Sweden and U.K.  For him, flying has become second nature and he doesn’t bat an eyelid nowadays. He always behaves in an exemplary manner. 

I’m joking obviously. 

Jackson

He’s a child.

They will always try and throw you a curve ball or eight.  You know, to keep you on you your toes. 

I remember the first time I went on a plane. I was eight years old and we were flying to London, our first holiday as a family.  

Travelling anywhere with my family was always a challenge.  You see, my parents are complete polar opposites.

Mum worries about EVERYTHING and has to be at the airport at least four hours before take off. She’ll have her bags packed at least a week in advance. 

My dad, on the other hand, well, he is never in a hurry and would probably arrive five minutes before boarding if he got his way. 

Let’s just say this is a recipe for disaster/interesting family time.

I got the travelling bug right away. 

I loved watching all the people rushing round to different destinations, the cabin crew – so sleek and professional, and feeling the plane take off into the clouds for the first time, watching Arlanda disappear 

Nowadays, the novelty of flying has worn off somewhat.

I’ve flown with many airlines to all kinds of destinations – both for work and leisure.  

I’ve had good trips and awful trips. I’ve been on long flights and short flights. I’ve missed flights and slept on an airport floor.  (Yes, really). 

Although I’ve had so many experiences with airplane travel,  some things are a constant.

I’m sure most of you will know these things already, but here’s a list of a few things we’ve picked up along the way.

Livermore’s Top Tips:

  1. People will always rush to board the plane. It doesn’t matter whether you fly short or long haul, budget or premium – we all want to get on that flight prontissimo.  You either join them or sit down and wait in protest.  Or you book first class and sail by the queue – up to you and your budget.  We’ll all end up on the same plane after all. 
  2. Boarding sequence is a weird one but generally speaking, if you have seats at the front or the very back you’ll either be boarding first and off first – or on first, off last. (Again, unless you fly Business or First Class) 
  3. Buy your snacks and food before flying. It’ll be nicer and cheaper.  Everyone does it so don’t worry about what’s etiquette. 
  4. Having said that, recently we’ve had some very meals with SAS and Tui respectively. I think airlines are upping their game! 
  5. Prepare for the unexpected. When we flew to Tenerife the cabin crew suddenly announced that we would be landing in Agadir, Morocco to drop off some crew. (I’m not kidding!) Bring extra nappies, babymilk, wipes, spare clothes and board games.
  6. Invest in a good power bank. An iPad is your best friend on long flights. You want it fully charged!
  7. I’ve said it before – headphone splitters. They will save many fights – err, I mean flights, in the future.
  8. I screen shot all the booking emails (parking, tickets, airplane lounges, car hire etc, etc) and the inside of the passport and then save into an album on my phone. That way I have all the info I need at hand in case the hard copies go awol and I don’t need to sift through numerous emails. 
  9. Most airline check ins can also be done really easily via an app.
  10. Team tag your luggage. If you’re like the majority of the population then you most likely own a black, red or navy suitcase.  (Unless you’re like me and love pink and purple coloured bags!) 
  11. We bring a refillable bottle and take through security. You can fill them up on the other side for free! 
  12. Another thing we do is to have a case for all our cables/chargers. That way, they’re all in one place and easy to access on the plane or once you’re at your destination. 

Happy Travels!

My flowery suitcase

Love, Jess

How to make Spooky Halloween Brownies

Being a Swenglish family we have the luxury to mix, amend, borrow and sometimes create a lot of our holidays. We can chose the things we like and make them into our own family tradition. 

For example, we celebrate traditional

Swedish holidays like Lucia and Midsummer, we have a Crayfish party in August, and an annual Eurovision party in May. 

We have a little mini Swedish Christmas on the 24th of December with the Christmas ham and Jansson’s but our Christmas is on the 25th.  

We celebrate Bonfire night, “Mys” on a Friday and generally have a roast every Sunday. 

We join the hordes of other revellers in park on a Bank holiday. (Even if it rains!) 

It made me think though. Other than Easter and a Royal Wedding – what other British holidays are there? 

Anyway. It’s lovely to pick and choose really. The best of both worlds!

We’ve also borrowed from our cousins overseas and have totally embraced Halloween.

The best Halloween I ever experienced was when I lived in Illinois in the nineties, but that’s a story for another day. 

This year we’re in Tenerife, Spain on holiday over Halloween and so it has been a very different experience. 

Believe Hotel Halloween Entertainment Schedule

The hotel we’re staying in have gone full out, with tons of decorations and dress up opportunities and lots of different activities everyday so the kids (and grownups) will get the full Halloween experience! 

Apparently their Casa del Terror is meant to be be really scary…. We’ll send Brooks to trial and review it on Wednesday.  

For me, one of the awesome parts of Halloween is all the fun Halloween theme food you can serve – and eat! 

Before we left England the kids and I made some spooky brownies. They’re super easy to make and so tasty. Kids and grownup alike will love these!  

This is the recipe we used…

You’ll need:

2 bowls 

1 microwave safe bowl

Small pan

20 square tin 

Baking parchment 

Edible eyes (sugar craft) 

4 large eggs

250g unsalted butter

200g good quality cocoa powder

300g caster sugar 

300g flour 

Pinch of salt 

1/2 teaspoon of vanilla extract 

1/2 teaspoon of baking powder 

50g white chocolate and 50g dark  chocolate

Marshmallows (we used the extra big fluffy kind and used about 5) 

  1. Preheat you oven to 175°. We used a 20cm square tin for this. (It depends on the consistency you’re after. If you use a smaller tin your batter will be more gooey, if using a bigger tin, the batter will be crispy). Add some baking parchment to stop it from sticking to the bottom.
  2. Meanwhile, cut up your white and dark chocolate into chunks. You’ll use these later once the brownie isbaked. 
  3. Melt the butter and stir in the cocoa powder. 
  4. In a different bowl mix together eggs and sugar. Once mixed, fold in the dry ingredients adding the flour and baking powder last.  
  5. Tip you batter into the tin and spread out evenly.
  6. Add you white and dark chocolate chunks to the batter.
  7. Put your mixture into the oven and cook for about 20 -25 minutes. 
  8. Let your brownies cool.
  9. Once cooled, put your marshmallow into a microwave safe bowl and melt for about 30 seconds a go. You want it really sticky and gooey.
  10. Take your marshmallow mess and this is the tricky sticky part.
  11. Word of advice: You’ll have to work fast with this one as the mixture will cool and harden quickly. Dip your fingers into the marshmallow mixture and carefully pull strings over the brownie, effectively making a web like patter. Keep adding more and more marshmallow strings. 
  12. Add your edible eyes 
  13. Now it’s ready to be served whole as a cake, or cut into individual squares.


Love Halloween Hate Scary Movies

I love Halloween. 

Jackson trialling his electrifying Halloween costume

I love dressing up for Halloween. Under duress I dress up my children, dog and house. My husband is down with the dressing up but he’s firstly awesome and secondly an actor, so dressing up is second nature. 

My decoration collection has steadily been growing for years. A lot of the supermarkets stock a lot of fabulous Halloween decorations nowadays and I always head to TKMaxx for any fun/extravagant extras. And I ain’t done yet. 

Alfie wearing his Lion outfit

Every year I research different themes and  with the kids we come up with fun ghoulish food and drinks menus. I go full out. 

(Mind you, that is true for most Holidays. I go BIG. But that’s for another day) 

However, as we have small children I try and find themes that are less offensive and scary. 

More Casper, less Pennywise if you will. 

I love Halloween. The autumnal colours, pumpkin soup, dia de los muertos, candy, being creative – not only when it comes to costumes, but also the food. 

I hate Scary Movies. 

I really, really do. 

Watching Poltergeist as a teenager positively traumatised me. I had nightmares for weeks. Heck, even now, if I see the TV flicker the hairs at the back of my neck stand up. 

And don’t even get me started on those twins in the Shining or Linda Blair in The Exorcist.

Even though I dislike them so much, I’ve somehow watched most of the more notorious scary films. 

As an adult though I refuse to watch them. My imagination runs away with me and I can’t sleep.  

A lot of pop-culture references and iconic characters come from horror films. I’m sure you can name a few; Michael Myers, Jason, Norman Bates or (perhaps the scariest of all) Freddy Krueger. 

 Fortuitously, growing up I missed the whole Nightmare on Elm Street franchise and recently I thought it a splendid idea to acquaint myself with it.  You know, to see what all the fuss was about. 

Surely it wouldn’t be scary now, I’m a grown woman, it’s the middle of the day, it’s just a film. 

Wrong. 

Brooks found me on our sofa in the lounge, pop music blasting out from the speakers, all the lights on, no sound on the TV watching Nightmare of Elm Street, hiding behind a big pillow. 

This year we’ll be away in Spain for Halloween so the kids and I decided to have our own spooktastic party early.

We’re making spooky brownies, spooky cupcakes and mummy frankfurters. 

Today we were making hot dog mummies. Such an easy dish to make and the kids love it. Here is the recipe I used: 

Frankfurter Mummy

You’ll need:

  • a packet of hot dogs/Frankfurters (8)
  • puff pastry, either shop bought or make your own 
  • Mustard 
  • Edible Eyes, for decorating once cooked and cooled
  • An egg (for the egg wash) 
  • Ketchup for the (historically inaccurate, yet very tasty) blood
Puff pastry ready to be cut into strips

Preheat your oven to about 180 (160 Fan assisted)

Take your puff pastry out and carefully cut out thin strips.

Now thread the strips around the frankfurters. You don’t have to be too precise, they’re mummies after all.

Once you’ve covered them with pastry, place them on a baking sheet. 

Egg wash your frankfurter mummies.

Place in your oven and bake until the pastry is brown. (About 15 – 20 minutes or so) 

Take your hot dogs out and let them cool. Add little dots of mustard at the top of every frankfurter and add the edible eyes for the finished look. 

Enjoy! 

Frankfurter Mummies